Here’s what’s happening at the coastal power plant nearest you


Change is afoot for all seven coastal energy crops in Orange and Los Angeles counties, because of a change in state policy governing the crops and a transfer by plant operators to extra efficient electrical energy-producing models.

Ocean-cooled engines are being phased out, with the brand new models using air-cooled know-how. New, upgraded operations are usually smaller than those they’re changing — including shorter stacks — and one plant is closing down completely.

Read Coastal power plants get dramatic upgrades, but how do they fit with California’s renewable energy future? 

The remaining crops may have a minimum of two models each. Most models have one stack, however some share a stack and a few have two stacks.

Here’s what’s occurring at every plant.

The previous, left, and new, right, parts of the AES Huntington Seashore natural fuel energy plant are mirrored in the Huntington Seashore Wetlands off Magnolia Road in Huntington Seashore, CA on Monday, December three, 2018. (Photograph by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG)

AES Huntington Seashore

Ocean-cooled models: 2 stacks, 214′ every. Offline by finish of 2020, demolition 2026.

Air-cooled models: 2 stacks, one hundred fifty′ each. On-line by finish of 2020. There’s a risk of a second part with two eighty′ stacks if a purchaser for more electricity emerges.


Haynes Producing Station in Lengthy Seashore. (Courtesy of L.A. Dept. of Water and Energy)

Haynes Producing Station, Long Seashore (L.A. Dept. of Water and Power)

Ocean-cooled models: 10 stacks, one hundred forty′ to 240′. 6 stacks now offline with demolition by end of 2021. 4 different stacks to be offline in 2029, demolition TBD.

Air-cooled models: 6 stacks, one hundred fifty′ every, online 2013.


AES Alamitos Producing Station, Long Seashore. (SCNG file photograph)

AES Alamitos, Long Seashore

Ocean-cooled models: 6 stacks, 206′ to 216′. Offline by finish of 2020, demolition 2024.

Air-cooled models: 2 stacks, one hundred fifty′ every. Online by end of 2020. There’s a risk of a second part with two eighty′ stacks if a buyer for more electrical energy emerges.


Harbor Producing Station in Wilmington. (Courtesy L.A. Dept. of Water and Energy)

Harbor Generating Station, Wilmington (L.A. Dept. of Water and Power)

Ocean-cooled models: 2 stacks, 162′ each. Offline by end of 2029, demolition TBD.

Air-cooled models: 5 stacks, one hundred and five′ every. Online 2002.


AES energy plant in Redondo Seashore. (2015, Chuck Bennett/Every day Breeze/SCNG)

AES Redondo Seashore

Ocean-cooled models: 5 stacks, 206′ to 216′. Offline by finish of 2020. Plant to be closed, demolition TBD.


NRG El Segundo Power Middle. (2013, Photograph by Brad Graverson/The Every day Breeze/SCNG)

El Segundo Power Middle (NRG/ Clearway Power)

Ocean-cooled models: 2 stacks, 215′ every. Offline, demolition full.

Air-cooled models: 2 stacks, 210′. Online 2013.


Scattergood Producing Station, Playa del Rey. (Might 2016, SNG/Day by day Breeze photograph)

Scattergood Generating Station, Playa del Rey (L.A. Dept. of Water and Energy)



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